Tiffany Pesonen - RE/MAX Regal | San Ardo, CA Real Estate


Put a mortgage down payment of 20% or more toward the purchase of a new home and you could lower your monthly loan installments by at least $100. A sizable down payment could also position you as a smart risk to lenders. If you're mortgage is approved, you could yield another reward, less interest to pay over the life of your loan. But, how do you get there, especially when you consider your other financial responsibilities, expenses like student loans, credit card bills and insurance. Fortunately, there are actions that you can take to start building money to put toward a down payment on a new home. Make a Decision and Stick To It Decide how much you want to save for your mortgage down payment. Give yourself enough time to build your savings. For example, if you want to put $10,000 toward your down payment, consider giving yourself two to three years to reach your goal. If you're downsizing, money from the sale of your current home could go toward the down payment on your new home. There are online budget templates that you can use to track your current spending. It’s also good to get in the habit of reviewing your monthly bank statement. Not only can this alert you to erroneous charges on your account, it can open your eyes to how much money you could be saving. If you’re still living with your parents, take an honest look at your spending habits. How much money do you spend on restaurant food, clothes, shoes, concert tickets and other entertainment? At first glance, you might think that you only spend $100 a month on entertainment, when you could actually be spending $250 a month. Let your parents know that you're putting money away for a mortgage down payment. They might lower your rent to help you save. Should you be living on your own, consider taking in a roommate to split your rent. Use the other half of the money that you formerly put toward your rent to save for your mortgage down payment. Other ways to save a mortgage down payment are: • Work a part-time job and deposit those earnings into an interest bearing account. Use your skills to telecommute. For example, you could work as a web page designer, computer programmer, freelance writer, virtual instructor or virtual assistant from home. • Put job bonuses and other incentive pay toward your down payment. • Deposit tax refunds in your interest bearing account. • Combine insurance plans and place the savings in your interest bearing account. • Take advantage of cable, telephone and internet service provider discounts, placing the savings toward your down payment. • Rent out a portion of your home and put the rent toward a down payment on a new home. • Use coupons when grocery shopping. Go to the grocery store on double coupon days and you could save $30 or more a week. • Limit unnecessary spending until you reach your mortgage down payment goal. • Set your thermostat to 65. During summer months, get outdoors to avoid keeping the air conditioner on for hours at a time. During winter months, consider using a sweater. • Sell furniture that you are not using. For example, you could hold a yard sale and deposit proceeds from the yard sale in your savings account. • Until you reach your mortgage down payment goal, consider taking day trips rather than vacationing overseas or on long out-of-town stays that require you to take on airline, hotel and rental car expenses. Stick to your plan. Doing so, could yield you thousands of dollars in savings during house buying negotiations and over the lifetime of your mortgage. Sticking to your savings plan could also strengthen your money management skills, so that you avoid debt and continue to build equity long after you move into your new home.

If you are thinking of buying your first home, you’re thinking of making the single biggest purchase of your entire lifetime. Real estate is complex. From getting finances in order to understanding the entire process to securing the home you love, there’s so much that you’ll need to know when it comes to buying your first home. 


What Is A Down Payment?


A down payment is a one-time cash payment that you’ll provide at the closing table when you buy a home. How much your down payment is will have an effect on how much your monthly mortgage payment will be. It will also affect your initial home equity value. 


Should You Keep Renting?


First, you’ll need to think of a savings goal and a timeline. The general rule is that if you own a home for at least 5 years, you have gotten your “money’s worth” out of the closing costs and the fees you paid at the time you purchased your home. If you don’t think you’ll stay in a home for at least 5 years before making another move, you may want to consider renting until you know where you want to settle. 


What Can You Afford? 


You’ll need to calculate just how much home you can afford. Look at potential monthly mortgage payments plus taxes, fees, insurance, utilities and other monthly expenses that you have.


In dual-income households, it’s nice if the living expenses can be covered just by one person’s paycheck. Once you have an idea of your budget, you can price out homes that will meet your needs and be in your price range. 


Why You Should Save More


The best practice in buying a home is to put 20% down on the house. With this sizable down payment, it will be easier to get approved for a mortgage. You’ll also avoid needing PMI (private mortgage insurance.) This is an additional cost for people who put down less than a 20% down payment. This can cost you a lot of money each month, so it’s best to save as much as you can for that initial down payment. 


Don’t be discouraged. You can still buy a home with a lower percentage of a down payment, but you’ll have to pay for the PMI and include the additional expense in your budget. The Federal Housing Administration has many different options available that allow you to put a smaller down payment on a home, so do your homework.  


How To Save 

           

Once you get an idea of about how much you’ll spend on your home, you need to take action and start saving. There are many ways that you can save automatically without even thinking about it. You can choose a fixed amount or percentage of your paycheck and save it automatically into the house fund. Save as much as you can so you’ll be able to make your home purchase more quickly. You may even want to consider putting your money into a money market account for a higher return on your savings once you reach a certain goal. 


Don’t Forget To Save Your Bonuses


Whether you have received a gift or a sizable Christmas bonus, make sure that you put that money away towards your home purchase. Every little bit helps. While we may have an inclination to want to spend the money on more immediate things, you’ll be happy that you saved your money when you head to purchase your house! 


Use Your IRA


The IRS allows a tax benefit for first time home buyers. You can take out up to $10,000 out of your IRA or Roth IRA for a first time home purchase. Your Roth IRA account must be at least 5 years old in order for you to do this. Distributions from this account are tax-free, but you’ll need to pay tax if you withdraw form a traditional IRA. You should discuss any withdrawals that you do make with your financial advisor and your tax advisor. This could be an opportunity for you to build your wealth in a new way, so make an informed decision. 


Happy saving and happy house hunting!




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